Journal of Electrical Engineering : Volume 19 / 2019 - Edition : 2

MINIMAL PATH COST-BASED SURVIVABILITY MODEL FOR IP-OVER WDM NETWORKS USING ACO-MST METHODS

Authors:
R. CHITRA
M. SABRIGIRIRAJ
Domain:
building electrification
Abstract:
Abstract—Nowadays, the preservation of the survivability of the network devices against the multiple link failures is an attractive research in the Internet Protocol (IP) over Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) networks. Several protection schemes such as the restoration/backup schemes, cross-layer cut sets and shared risk group are used to preserve the network survivability. But, the conversion process of Optical-Electrical-Optical (OEO) conversion among the devices, large processing overhead, lack of instant update of link parameters and the periodical maintenance are the major limitations in such schemes. This paper proposes the full-fledged optical concept with the hybrid algorithms such as Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) for an efficient communication through the optical links. The proposed research employs the structural approach called Graph theory to model the links and devices as edges and nodes. The delay based pheromone construction and the transition probability estimation in this paper reduces the time consumption for route prediction and the converged quickly. The maintenance of list containing recomputed edge-disjoint alternate paths facilitates the alternate successful light path selection during the failure conditions effectively. The backup path estimation and their storage in the table by using the ACO and MST approaches in this paper predicts the alternate path to avoid the disruption in data transmission during the o
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